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    USC's Anthony Davis Named To College Football Hall Of Fame
    Anthony Davis was named to the 2005 class of the College Football Hall of Fame.
    Anthony Davis was named to the 2005 class of the College Football Hall of Fame.

    May 18, 2005

    Anthony Davis, a unanimous All-American tailback at USC who was a member of the Trojans' 1972 and 1974 national championship football teams and was the runnerup for the 1974 Heisman Trophy, has been named to the 13-member 2005 Division I-A class of the College Football Hall of Fame.

    Davis will be inducted at a Dec. 6 dinner in New York City and then enshrined into the College Football Hall of Fame in ceremonies in August of 2006 in South Bend, Ind.

    He is the 34th Trojan, including 27 players, in the College Football Hall of Fame. A Trojan has been elected into the Hall in each of the past six years.

    Davis' 2005 classmates include 10 other players--linebacker Cornelius Bennett of Alabama (1983-86), defensive back Tom Curtis of Michigan (1967-69), offensive tackle Keith Dorney of Penn State (1975-78), end Jim Houston of Ohio State (1957-59), quarterback John Huarte of Notre Dame (1962-64), fullback Roosevelt Leaks of Texas (1972-74), offensive tackle Mark May of Pittsburgh (1977-80), running back Joe Washington of Oklahoma (1972-75), defensive tackle Paul Wiggin of Stanford (1954-56) and wide receiver David Williams of Illinois (1983-85)--and two coaches: Pat Dye of East Carolina, Wyoming and Auburn (1974-92) and Don Nehlen of Bowling Green and West Virginia (1968-2002).

    Davis, a flashy, popular player known as A.D. who did a signature knee dance after touchdowns, was the first player in Pac-8 history to rush for 1,000 yards in three different seasons. He is long remembered for scoring 11 touchdowns in three games against Notre Dame, including six as a sophomore in the 1972 contest and four in the famous 55-24 comeback victory in 1974.

    The two-time (1973-74) All-Conference first teamer still ranks third on USC's career rushing chart (3,724 yards). He set an NCAA record with six scoring kickoff returns in his career (including three in 1974).

    He also was an outfielder on USC's 1973 and 1974 College World Series champion baseball teams.

    After USC, he played in the NFL, World Football League and Canadian Football League, then became an actor and is now a real estate developer in Southern California.