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PLAYING

BY

THE

RULES

A Guide to

NCAA Rules for

Every Alumnus

And Friend

Of USC Athletics.

Dear Alumni & Friends,

The University of Southern California is proud of its great tradition in intercollegiate athletics. We are committed to achieving in the classroom, while abiding by all National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) rules. Our athletic program would not be where it is today without the support of loyal alumni and friends of the program like yourself. Your support is equally important in our effort to maintain compliance with NCAA and Pac-12 Conference regulations. As an NCAA mem- ber, USC is responsible for the actions of those whom the NCAA considers "representatives of its athletics interests," traditionally known as boosters.

This guide provides the basic information con- cerning the NCAA rules regarding the recruitment of prospective student-athletes and contact with currently enrolled student-athletes. By assisting USC in rules compliance, you are helping preserve the integrity of Trojan Athletics and protecting the athletic eligibility of our student-athletes. Indeed, if a well-meaning but misguided fan or booster commits a violation of NCAA or Pac-12 legislation, USC will be held responsible. The consequences may include bans on post-season competition and TV coverage.

Please review this guide and share the informa- tion with others who support Trojan Athletics. The scope and complexity of NCAA rules preclude us from addressing every possible situation; however, feel free to contact the Compliance Office or our Faculty Athletic Representative with additional questions.

The University appreciates alumni and friends who strive for the highest level of ethical conduct while supporting the goals of academic and athletic excellence for our student-athletes.

Sincerely,

C.L. Max Nikias

Patrick C. Haden

President

Director of Athletics

Are You A Representative Of USC's

Athletics Interest (Booster)?

You are considered a "representative of the University's athletics interests" (commonly known as a booster) if you:

- Have made any type of financial or in-kind contribution to the athletics department or to an athletics booster organization;

- Are or have been a member of any organization or agency promoting USC athletics;

- Have assisted in any manner in the recruitment of prospective student-athletes;

- Have arranged for or provided benefits to enrolled student-athletes or their families or to prospective student-athletes or their families; or

- Have otherwise promoted USC's athletics program in any manner.

Once you have been identified as a booster, you retain that status FOREVER! As a USC booster, you are bound by NCAA, Pac-12 and University rules, and, therefore, USC is held responsible for your actions.

What Are The Consequences For Any

Involvement In NCAA Violations?

If a booster is found to be involved in a violation that results in the imposition of sanctions, the booster may be subject to the following consequences:

- Revocation of ticket privileges;

- Disassociation from the athletic department (e.g., loss of donor program and/or booster club privileges); or

- Loss of any other athletically related benefit or privilege deemed appropriate by USC.

Also, please remember that violations involving a prospective or an enrolled student-athlete may jeop- ardize that individual's eligibility for competition at USC. Therefore, we ask that you leave the recruitment of prospects to USC coaches and that you do not do anything that would jeopardize the eligibility of either a prospect or a student-athlete to compete for the Trojans.

Who Is A Prospect?

 

 

A prospect is any individual who has started

classes for the ninth (9th) grade, regardless

of

his or her athletics ability or participation.

A

prospect is also any student who is enrolled at a

two-year college or at a four-year institution other

than USC.

A student who has not yet started

ninth grade may become a prospect if USC or a

booster provides the individual, or the individual's

relatives or friends, with financial assistance or

benefits not generally provided to other students

or the general pubic.

 

An individual remains a prospect even after

he or she has signed a National Letter of Intent

or accepts an offer of financial aid to attend USC

until he or she reports for the first day of classes

for a regular term (fall or spring) or begins official

practice immediately prior to the start of classes.

You should treat ALL students as prospects.

 

 

 

What is Recruiting?

 

 

Recruiting is any solicitation of a prospect or

the prospect's parent/legal guardian by a University

staff member for the purpose of securing the

prospect's enrollment at USC and/or participation

in USC's intercollegiate athletics program.

 

 

 

Who May Recruit?

 

 

Only USC coaches and Athletic Department

staff may be involved in the recruiting process.

The NCAA rules specifically prohibit boosters

from engaging in any recruiting activities.

 

It is not permissible for coaches to involve an

individual associated with a prospect (but who is

not a family member) in the process of recruiting

that prospect. Thus, coaches may not ask the

third-party individual to relay information to the

prospect for them or to act as an intermediary in

order to assist the coach in the recruitment of the

prospect. In addition, coaches may not work with

that individual – instead of the prospect – to set up

the prospect's official or unofficial visit to campus.

Finally, coaches may not ask the individual to

encourage the prospect to attend USC.

 

What May Boosters Do?

You may bring outstanding prospects to the attention of the USC coaching staff by sending them newspaper clippings or other information about prospects. However, all evaluations and contacts are the sole responsibility of the USC coaching staff.

If you have an "established" relationship with a prospect or his or her relatives, you may continue normal contacts with those individuals with the understanding that such contacts are NOT made for recruiting purposes and are not arranged by USC athletic department staff members. Essentially, a relationship is "established" if the relationship:

- Predates the individual's status as a prospect (e.g., before the start of the ninth grade);

- Predates the prospect's status achieved as a result of his/her athletics ability or reputation; and

- Did not develop as a result of the prospect's participation in athletics or his or her notoriety as an athlete.

As a booster, you may attend high school and community college events, provided you do not contact prospects or anyone associated with the prospect (e.g., relatives, coaches, high school administrators) in an attempt to recruit the prospect. In addition, you may attend public events (e.g., banquet, fund-raising event) at which prospects are in attendance. However, NO donations, contact with the prospect (including anyone associated with the prospect) or other act should be made in an effort to persuade the prospect to attend USC.

I F YOU

BE COME

AWARE

OF AN Y VIOLA T ION OR

PO T EN T IAL

VIOLA T ION

O F

NCAA

RULE S,

OR

I F

YOU

HAVE

AN Y QUE ST ION S ABOU T WHA T

YOU

MA Y

OR MA Y NO T

DO ,

PLEA SE

CON T ACT :

U SC O FF I C E O F AT HLE T I C C OMPLIAN C E

840 C HILD S W AY , BK S 402

L O S ANGELE S, C A 90089-2544

T EL : (213) 740-3832

FAX : (213) 740-4559

WWW .U SCT ROJAN S.C OM /AT HLE T I CC OMPLIAN C E

What Are Boosters Prohibited From

Doing?

You may not have any contact with a prospect or his/her relatives. Prohibited contact includes correspondence, e-mail, communication via social networking sites (e.g., Twitter, Facebook) or Internet (e.g., Skype), faxes, telephone conversations and in-person contacts (both on and off campus). If a prospect (or one of his/her relatives) approaches you regarding USC, explain that NCAA rules prevent you from discussing USC with him/her.

Other prohibited activities include, but are not limitedto,thefollowing:

- Inviting

a prospect or his or her relatives

to any

booster function or alumni event.

- Talking with a prospect or his or her relatives on USC's campus or at any athletics event. This includes pre- and post-game functions and tailgate parties.

- Providing a prospect or his or her relatives with free or reduced rate transportation, meals, lodging, gifts, entertainment or expenses for any type of service.

- Calling, writing, e-mailing, texting, tweeting or posting on a prospect's Facebook or other social network encouraging attendance at USC.

- Obtaining film/videotape or transcripts from a prospect's educational institution in an effort to evaluate the prospect's academic eligibility or athletics ability.

- Entertaining or providing gifts, tickets or

other benefits to club, junior or senior high school, prep school or junior college coaches.

- Arranging or creating employment opportunities for relatives, friends or legal guardians of prospects.

- Arranging for loans, special discounts or free or reduced charges for professional or personal services, housing or other purchases or charges. Loaning or giving money or other tangible items (e.g., clothes, cars, electronics, jewelry) is prohibited.

- Providing transportation (e.g., a ride or use of a car) to or from a summer job or to any other site.

Common Questions

Q: The son or daughter of an old friend is being

actively recruited by a USC coach.

Do I

have

to stop having any contact with the

prospect

and

his or her parents?

 

 

A:No, you may continue to enjoy the same relationship with the family that you had before. You may not, however, use your relationship to urge that the son or daughter choose USC, and you may not allow a coach to enlist you in the recruitment process.

Q:What should I do if I encounter a prospect while watching my son or daughter's high school athletic contest?

A:The NCAA rules prohibit boosters from having in-person contacts with prospects. However, the rules recognize that a booster may have inadvertent (without prearrangement) contact with a prospect. In this situation, the booster may exchange a polite greetingwiththeprospect,but thenmustterminate theconversation.The exceptionDOESNOTapply if the contact occurs at the prospect's school, or at a site where the prospect is competing. In these circumstances, NO contact of any kind is permitted.

Q:May I attend a public event—for example, a community picnic or a high school banquet or

awards dinner—if prospects are also in attendance?

A:Yes, you may. Be sure, though, that you do not have any contact with prospects.

Q: What if a prospect initiates contact with me?

A:If a prospect initiates contact with you either in person or by telephone or mail, you are obligated to refer all questions regarding the University and it's athletics programs to the athletics department staff. You should also inform the prospect that NCAA rules prohibit recruiting contacts with anyone other than the athletic department staff. Finally, you should let the Athletic Compliance Office know that a contact occurred and the content of any conversation.

Q:May I talk to a prospect before, after or on the sidelines at the prospect's athletics contest?

A:No. While a booster is allowed to attend and observe a prospect's athletic contest, he or she may not make contact with the prospect, his or her relatives or coaches during such occasion.

What if I Know of a Great Prospect?

If you know of a high school student-athlete who might want to attend the University of Southern California, the only permissible activity for a booster is to call the appropriate coach.

Baseball . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .740-5762

Men's Basketball . . . . . . . . . . . .740-3815

Women's Basketball . . . . . . . . . .740-7204

Football . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .740-4204

Men's Golf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .740-0687

Women's Golf . . . . . . . . . . . . . .740-0687

Women's Lacrosse . . . . . . . . . . .740-0917

Women's Rowing . . . . . . . . . . . .740-3830

Women's Sand Volleyball . . . . . .740-3818

Women's Soccer . . . . . . . . . . . . .740-1356

Men's Swimming & Diving . . . . .740-8444

Women's Swimming & Diving . .740-8444

Men's Tennis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .740-3829

Women's Tennis . . . . . . . . . . . .740-3828

Track & Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . .821-2170

Men's Volleyball . . . . . . . . . . . .740-3839

Women's Volleyball . . . . . . . . . .740-4151

May Student-Athletes Promote An Organization or Make An Appearance?

You may not use the name or likeness of an enrolled student-athlete to directly or indirectly ad- vertise, recommend or promote the sale or use of a commercial product or service of any kind (includ- ing selling items with the student-athlete's name or likeness). Doing so will render the student-athlete ineligible for competition. All charitable, educa- tional and nonprofit promotional activities involv- ing student-athletes must have prior approval from the athletics department. This includes speaking engagements at any USC booster organization event.

You may not use any item (e.g., poster, ball) signed by a USC coach, student-athlete or staff member in an auction, raffle or any other type of fund-raising activity to raise money for any high school project.

What Is An Extra Benefit?

An extra benefit is any special arrangement by an institutional employee or a booster to provide a prospective or current student-athlete (or their relatives or friends) a benefit that is not generally available to the public or other USC students or is not expressly authorized by NCAA legislation.

Any inappropriate, even inadvertent, activity with or involving a student-athlete (or his or her family or friends) could result in:

Declaring- a prospective or current student- athlete ineligible to participate for USC. Sanctions- placed on the University and its programs.

Restrictions- placed upon your involvement with USC's athletics program.

Examples of Extra Benefits:

The following are common examples of "extra-ben- efits" that may not be provided to prospects or student- athletes and their relatives or friends. This is not an exhaustive list.

- Providing gifts of any kind (e.g., birthday, holiday, graduation).

- Providing discounted or free meals, entertainment or lodging (e.g., rent, housing, hotel).

- Providing free or reduced-cost transportation of any kind, including borrowing a car or pro- viding a ride home or to see family or friends.

- Providing free or reduced-cost services, such as long distance telephone use, car repairs or haircuts.

- Providing cash or loans in any amount or signing or co-signing a note with an outside

agency to arrange a loan.

- Providing any expenses (e.g.,

travel,

lodging)

for relatives or friends of a student-athlete, in-

cluding expenses to

visit campus,

to

attend

a home or

away competition or to attend an

event (e.g.,

awards

banquet)

at any

location.

- Providing academic course supplies, typing ser- vices or duplicating costs.

What May Boosters Do For Current

Student-Athletes?

You may employ a student-athlete, as long as he or she is paid only for work performed and at the going rate in that locale for similar services. Any employment benefits (e.g., bonuses, transportation to/from job) provided to the student-athlete must be provided to all other employees performing similar services for the employer. Appropriate paperwork must be submitted to the Compliance Office before the student-athlete is permitted to work.

Common Questions

Q:May I give a discount on clothing, food or car rentals to student-athletes as part of my business?

A:No. A discount that is specifically for student- athletes is considered an extra benefit and is against NCAA rules. However, if you provide a discount to all USC students or the general public, then student-athletes may also receive the discount.

Q:May I loan my car to the parents of a student- athlete who are in town visiting their child?

A:No. The NCAA's prohibition on extra benefits for student-athletes also applies to their relatives and friends.

Q:May I allow a student-athlete to use my land line or cell phone to make a telephone call?

A:No, this would constitute an extra benefit and is impermissible.

Q:I have an extra car that I don't use, is it ok to lend it to a student-athlete?

A:The provision of free transportation would constitute an extra-benefit. This includes loaning a car, free plane tickets home, or paying for transportation for the student-athlete's relatives to attend a competition.

Q:: May I purchase a complimentary admission ticket from a student-athlete?

A:No, a student-athlete may not receive payment for his or her complimentary admissions and may not exchange them for any item of value (e.g., meal, apparel).

T HANK

Y OU FOR

CARING

ABOU T

U SC AT HLE T I CS

AND T AKING T IME

T O R EAD T HI S GUIDE .

YOUR

H ELP I N

PREVEN T ING

 

V IOLA T ION S

I S V I T AL AND

I S

APPRE CIA T ED

AS

MU CH AS

 

AN Y OT HER PAR T

YOU PLA Y I N

SUPPOR T ING

U SC' S AT HLE T I CS

PROGRAM .

National Collegiate Athletic Association

P.O. Box 6222

Indianapolis, IN 46206-6222

(317) 917-6222

Thank you for your support of USC Athletics and your continued commitment to NCAA rules compliance. By knowing and following the applicable NCAA rules, you will assist us in maintaining the level of excellence that USC continually strives to achieve.

If you become aware of any violation or poten- tial violation of NCAA rules, or if you have any questions about what you may and may not do, please contact us:

USC Office of Athletic Compliance

840 Childs Way, BKS 402

Los Angeles, CA 90089-2544

(213) 740-3832

Additional information is available at: www.usctrojans.com/athleticcompliance www.pac-12.org

www.ncaa.org